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Energy company fined after worker injured

Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy has been sentenced after a contractor was injured by a falling steel wire coil.

Peterborough Magistrates’ Court heard how, on 23 April 2017, a contractor was working at the Galloper Offshore Wind Farm pre-assembly site in Great Yarmouth when a steel wire coil, weighing 50kg, dropped onto their left forearm and wrist. The worker suffered a fractured wrist as a result of the incident.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy Ltd failed to ensure a suitable and sufficient risk assessment and adequate control measures were in place to prevent the injury.

Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy Ltd of Farady House, Sir Williams Siemens Square, Frimely, was found guilty of breaching Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and was fined £66,000. and ordered to pay £10,106.38 in costs.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Steve Lewis commented: “This could have been easily prevented if the defendant had put in place simple measures to reduce the risk of injury from dropped objects.

“Undertaking suitable and sufficient risk assessment and developing safe system of work which follow the hierarchy of control are an important element of risk control and reduction. “

Notes to Editors:
1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/energy-company-fined-after-worker-injured/

HSE proud to fly Suffrage Flag over Buxton laboratory

Britain’s regulator for workplace health and safety celebrated 100 years of votes for women by flying the women’s Suffrage Flag over its world leading laboratory in Buxton.

On Monday 15 October 2018 HSE hosted the Suffrage Flag relay event, one of the UK Government celebrations to mark the 100 year anniversary of some women obtaining the vote.

Over the course of 2018 the Suffrage Flag is travelling around government departments and agencies across the UK. The flag is purple, green and white, the colours of the Women’s Social and Political Union or Suffragettes, white for purity, purple for dignity and green for hope.

To mark the occasion staff held an EqualiTea morning, during which a display of archive material on women’s contribution to health and safety at work over the last 100 years was celebrated.

Special guests included local MP Ruth George, representatives from the Safety and Reliability Society and local charity Crossroads Derbyshire (formerly High Peak Women’s Aid), Sheila Pantry (editor of ‘Women of Courage’) and local historian Alan Roberts.

The event also raised funds for Crossroads Derbyshire, which covers the whole of the High Peak, and works with more than 500 families each year who are escaping domestic abuse.

Dr Karen Russ, Director of HSE Science said: “We were immensely proud to have hosted this event. It was a celebration that brought together so many people reflecting our pride at the laboratory being based in this wonderful location. We had the opportunity to discuss the impact women have had on science and regulation in HSE, equality at work and increasing the number of women working in science and engineering.”

Vicky Bunnage, Business Officer at Crossroads Derbyshire said: “Thank you so much to all at HSE for inviting us along to this event and raising funds to support women experiencing abuse here in the High Peak. It was great to be part of the celebration of some women getting the vote and we would like to thank the HSE and all the organisers for including us.”

 

Notes to Editors:

 

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. Further details on this Government initiative can be found at https://civilservice.blog.gov.uk/2018/02/07/how-the-civil-service-is-celebrating-the-centenary-of-womens-suffrage/

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/hse-proud-to-fly-suffrage-flag-over-buxton-laboratory/

Company fined after agency worker injured on waste conveyor

A haulage and waste processing business has been fined after an agency worker’s hand was drawn into an in running nip on a waste sorting conveyor.

Telford Magistrates Court heard how, on 27 September 2016, an 18-year-old agency worker was trying to clear a blockage beneath a waste conveyor belt. He reached in with his hand to remove the material causing the blockage when his hand was drawn in by the in-running nip on the conveyor system. He suffered partial amputation of his finger and a fractured elbow.

An investigation into the incident by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), found there was inadequate guarding around the conveyor belt to prevent workers hands being caught up in the conveyor.

Loosemores Transport Ltd of Battlefield, Shrewsbury pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 11(1) of the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998. The company was fined £18,000 and ordered to pay costs of £2,026.70.

HSE inspector Wendy Campbell said after the hearing: “A young man’s life has been changed because the company failed to ensure there was correct guarding on the conveyor belt.

“This should serve as a reminder to all companies to check their machinery guarding is adequate and prevents access to dangerous parts of machinery”.


Notes to Editors:

1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/company-fined-after-agency-worker-injured-on-waste-conveyor/

Company fined for failing to recognise hand arm vibration risk

British Airways Avionic Engineering Limited has been fined for failing to assess the risk to workers from hand arm vibration.

Cardiff Crown Court heard how people working at the company were exposed to vibration from use of a wet blasting cabinet and vibrating hand tools. It was not until late in 2013 that action was taken by the company to assess and reduce vibration risk, despite the Control of Vibration at Work Regulations having been in force since July 2005 and were preceded by similar risk assessment requirements.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that the company failed in their duty to recognise and properly assess the risk from hand arm vibration at their facility in Talbot Green, South Wales.

British Airways Avionic Engineering Limited of Waterside, Harmondsworth, pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 5 of the Control of Vibration at Work Regulations 2005, and has been fined £80,000 and ordered to pay costs of £25,297.57.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Helen Turner said, “This was a case of the company failing to identify the risk from hand arm vibration, which is a recognised health risk with potentially disabling consequences.

“Unless vibration is identified and properly assessed, an employer won’t know the level of risk, and whether action is needed to protect workers. It is very important that people exposed to hand arm vibration at work are informed of the symptoms of early exposure and given opportunities to discuss their health so that they can be protected from serious Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome or Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”


Notes to Editors:

1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/company-fined-for-failing-to-recognise-hand-arm-vibration-risk/

Steel fabricator fined after young construction worker falls from height

A North Devon-based steel fabricator has been sentenced after a young employee fell through a fragile roof whilst at work.

Plymouth Magistrates’ Court heard how, on 23rd August 2017, a 19-year old employed by Mark Dayment, trading as Langaton Steel Fabrications, was on his first day of working on a roof replacement project at a petrol filling station in Barnstaple. Whilst assisting another worker, he took a few steps off the walkway and fell 7.5 metres through a thin metal sheet onto the concrete forecourt below. The young worker suffered serious head injuries, a broken pelvis and a broken wrist as a result of the fall.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found the work was not properly planned, appropriately supervised or carried out in a safe manner when the incident occurred. Mr Dayment, had a duty to control how the work was carried out, including staff supervision.

Mark Dayment of North Road, South Moulton pleaded guilty to breaching Section 4 (1) of the Work at Height Regs 2005, and has been fined £12,000 and ordered to pay costs of £2,228.70.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Nicole Buchanan said: “This young man’s injuries were life-changing and he could have easily been killed. This serious incident and devastation could have been avoided if basic safe guards had been put in place.

“Falls from height remain one of the most common causes of work-related fatalities and injuries in this country and the risks associated with working at height are well-known.”

Notes to Editors:
1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/steel-fabricator-fined-after-young-construction-worker-falls-from-height/

South Yorkshire manufacturing company fined after worker suffers hand injuries

Symmetry Medical Sheffield Limited, trading as Tecomet, was sentenced today for safety breaches after a worker suffered serious injuries.

Sheffield Magistrates’ Court heard how on 8 August 2016, the worker was helping to move a hardness testing machine when it fell from the pedestrian pallet truck it was being transported on and struck his left hand.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that the machine, which was resting on a stand, was lifted with a pedestrian pallet truck by the worker. The worker had not been trained on how to use the truck and the machine stand did not have suitable channels for the forks of the truck. The machine and stand were not secured to the pallet truck and the machine fell and came away from the stand. It toppled towards a wall and struck the workers hand resulting in a full amputated finger and impact damage to a second finger.

Symmetry Medical Sheffield Ltd trading as Tecomet of Beulah Road, Sheffield pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2 (1) of the Health Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and was fined £275,000.00 with £1237.00 costs.

After the hearing, HSE inspector Anuja Mistry-Raval commented: “This incident could so easily have been avoided by implementing suitable control measures and adopting safe working practices.

“The risks of loads falling from lifting equipment when not properly attached or secured in place are well known.

“Suitable systems of work are fundamental for ensuring workers’ safety.”

Notes to Editors

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/ [1]
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/south-yorkshire-manufacturing-company-fined-after-worker-suffers-hand-injuries/

Fine for engineering company following life-changing hand injuries to worker

An engineering company has been fined after an employee’s little finger and ring finger were amputated at the first knuckle.

Birmingham Magistrates’ Court heard that on 29 January 2018 the employee was working at a site on Holford Way in Birmingham when his gloved hand came into contact with a rotating spindle on a Slack and Par horizontal quick tapping machine and became entangled.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that Rical Ltd trading as Avon PDC failed to ensure that effective measures were taken to prevent access to the dangerous parts, namely the rotating spindles, of a Slack and Parr horizontal quick tapping machine.

Rical Limited, trading as Avon PDC of Holford Way, Witton, Birmingham pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 11(1) of The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 and has been fined £14,000 and ordered to pay costs of £1,383.88.

Speaking after the hearing HSE inspector Karen Sweeney said “This injury was easily preventable and the risk should have been identified. Employers should make sure they properly assess and apply effective control measures to minimise the risk from dangerous parts of machinery.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regular for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. hse.gov.uk

  1. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at legislation.gov.uk/

 

  1. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

  1. Further information about health and safety can be found at http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg33.htm.

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/fine-for-engineering-company-following-life-changing-hand-injuries-to-worker/

Brick manufacturer fined after worker seriously injured in machinery incident

Forterra Building Products Limited has been fined after a worker had his left arm amputated and was left paralysed from the chest down after being drawn into machinery.

Burnley Magistrates’ Court heard how on 8 July 2017, Eddie Ely, a chargehand with Forterra Building Products Ltd was working with a group of colleagues to remove a blockage and spillage on a conveyor when he was drawn into the conveyor system. Guards had been removed from the machine but the power had not been isolated.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that Forterra Building Products Ltd had failed to properly ensure that machines were always isolated from power, to be made safe, before guarding was removed from machinery.

Forterra Building Products Ltd pleaded guilty to breaching Sections 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc act 1974. Total fines of £200000 were imposed with costs of £7529.11.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Steven Boyd said: “This case shows the devastating consequences of coming into contact with dangerous machinery. It is crucial that companies have a clear procedure for isolating machinery and they have appropriate supervision and monitoring to ensure it is adhered to.”

Notes to Editors

1.The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk

2.More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/ [1]

3.HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/brick-manufacturer-fined-after-worker-seriously-injured-in-machinery-incident/

Building company and director sentenced after carrying out unsafe and unnecessary work

A building company and its director have been sentenced today after carrying out unsafe and unnecessary building work.

BBS Improvements Limited and sole director Barrie John Henry Birch were sentenced after a joint investigation by Worcestershire Trading Standards Service and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) uncovered a string of health and safety and fraud offences.

Worcester Crown Court heard how Mr Birch, operating under BBS Improvements Ltd, was employed to carry out building work on a domestic property in Redditch in May 2017. A complaint was made to Trading Standards who instructed an expert to examine the roof. The expert confirmed that the work was wholly unnecessary and that the work done had no value whatsoever. During the course of their investigations Trading Standards also uncovered potential health and safety issues.

HSE inspectors found that the company was carrying out work at height without scaffolding and that there were no measures in place to prevent employees from falling.

People were walking on the roof of the house with no safety measures in place to prevent them from falling and Mr Birch was present and fully aware of the people working unsafely on the roof.

At the time the complaint was received Mr Birch was also before the court for similar offences committed while trading as a sole trader under the name BBS Improvements.

The Court heard how Mr Birch was employed to carry out minor roofing repair work on a domestic property in Bromsgrove in June 2016. After inspecting the roof Mr Birch advised the homeowner that the whole roof required replacing. A Trading Standards investigation, involving an expert examination of the roof found that the work to replace the roof was totally unnecessary.

Mr Birch admitted an offence under the Fraud Act 2006 and an offence under the Consumer Protection from unfair Trading Regulations 2008 in relation to unnecessary work carried out at a property in Bromsgrove during June 2016. He also pleaded guilty to breaching Section 37 of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974.

Mr Birch also asked for 5 other, similar matters to be taken into consideration including two offences of failing to provide the 10 Year Insurance Backed Guarantee.

For the Trading Standards offences and the HSE offences Mr Birch was sentenced to 12 months imprisonment, suspended for 2 years, ordered to do 250 hours of unpaid work and was disqualified from being a Company Director for 5 years. He was ordered to pay compensation to the victims and to make a contribution to the prosecution costs. BBS Improvements Limited pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 6 (3) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005 and the company was fined £200. Speaking after the hearing HSE inspector Matthew Whitaker said: “This prosecution demonstrates how the HSE works in partnership with other enforcers like Trading Standards, to tackle serious crime and dangerous working practices which put people at risk of death and serious injury. “Falls from height remain one of the most common causes of work related fatalities in this country and the risks associated with working at height are well known. “In this case, suitable measures such as scaffolding should have been provided to ensure the health and safety of people working at height on the roof”. Cllr Lucy Hodgson said: “The work done by our small team of Trading Standards Officers to protect Worcestershire consumers cannot go unrecognised.

“In this case Barrie Birch was instructed to carry out relatively minor work but then advised the homeowners that major work was needed when it was not.”

“This type of fraudulent activity will not be tolerated in Worcestershire. Our Trading Standards Officers actively investigate criminal complaints of rogue builders such as this, and will continue to do so to protect the public.

“The sentence handed down in this case clearly shows that the Courts view this type of offending very seriously.”

Notes to Editors

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/building-company-and-director-sentenced-after-carrying-out-unsafe-and-unnecessary-work/

Company and director sentenced after resident injured

A Cornish construction company and its director have been sentenced after a resident fell through the balcony at his home during recent refurbishment work.

Truro Magistrates’ Court heard how, on 18 August 2016, 58-year old Simon Powell, who has impaired mobility and suffers from epilepsy, had been sitting on the balcony at his property when he fell more than three metres through a plastic panel, which had been installed within his balcony and onto the beach below. Mr Powell suffered multiple fractures and damage to his liver. ChristalClearProperties Ltd had been working on the refurbishment of the neighbouring riverside property which included changes to that property’s balcony which required it to be extended to join that of Mr Powell’s.  Sheets of plywood and plastic were used to temporarily infill the completed balcony framework prior to the toughened safety glass infills being fitted.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that in the absence of safety glazing, the fall prevention measures were inadequate and there were no measures in place to prevent access to the balcony until the construction work had been completed. The investigation also found there was no construction phase plan in place and no specific risk assessment for the use of plywood or plastic as an interim measure. The plastic sheeting that had been used was an unsuitable material as it did not afford Mr Powell any impact protection.

ChristalClearProperties Ltd of Langurtho Road, Fowey, Cornwall pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and has been fined £22,000 with costs of £4,782.72.

Anthony John Ham of Langurtho Road, Fowey, Cornwall pleaded guilty to breaching Section 37 of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, and has been given a 12 week prison sentence, suspended for 12 months. He was also ordered to pay costs of £4782.72.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Georgina Speake said: “This incident could so easily have been avoided by simply carrying out correct control measures and safe working practices.

“Falls from height remain one of the most common causes of work related fatalities/injuries in this country and the risks associated with working at height are well known.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

 

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/company-and-director-sentenced-after-resident-injured/