Category Archives: Accident Report Form News

Construction company fined after worker seriously injured

A construction company has been fined after a worker suffered serious injuries when the first floor of the building he was standing on collapsed underneath him.

Manchester Minshull Street Crown Court heard how Huntsmere Projects Limited was the principal contractor for the construction of a new house in Alderley Edge. A subcontractor had installed the first floor but a gap left between the concrete beams on the landing was not identified by the Huntsmere site manager nor the contractor’s supervisor.

On the 22 April 2014, a 47-year-old worker fell approximately 3.5 metres when the concrete block beneath his feet gave way and he fell between two concrete beams, suffering serious multiple fractures.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found the collapse occurred as a result of some of the installed floor blocks becoming displaced during the work on site because of the gap. Huntsmere Projects Limited did not take all practicable steps to prevent danger to workers from collapse of a part of the new building. The investigation found that the company should have ensured that the floor was installed as per the design and failed to identify the gap which allowed the floor blocks to move.

Huntsmere Projects Ltd, of Alderley Road, Wilmslow, Cheshire, pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and was fined £240,000 with £14,439.53 costs.

HSE inspector, Deborah Walker, said after the hearing: “As principal contractor, Huntsmere Projects Limited was responsible for safety on the site including ensuring proper planning and co-ordination on the part of all involved in the project.

“Huntsmere Project Limited also had a duty to monitor and control the other contractors that it had engaged – the collapse could have been avoided had the company fulfilled its duties in its role as principal contractor”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We seek to prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. hse.gov.uk
  1. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/
  1. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk
  1. More information regarding safe working in the construction industry can be found at http://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/index.htm

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2017/construction-company-fined-after-worker-seriously-injured/

HSE food manufacturing inspections target the causes of workplace ill-health

Companies and people working in food manufacturing are being told they must pay closer attention to how they manage workplace health risks or face serious penalties.

The Health and Safety Executive’s (HSE) programme of proactive inspections will review health and safety standards in food manufacturing businesses across the country, and the sector is being warned that a programme of unannounced inspections will begin today.

The inspections will focus on two of the main causes of ill-health in the sector which are currently occupational asthma from exposure to flour dust in bakeries, cake and biscuit manufacturers and grain mills and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) – predominantly lower back pain and upper limb disorders from manual handling activities and repetitive tasks across the sector.

The inspection visits come as HSE recently released its Manufacturing sector plan which prioritises the reduction of cases of occupational lung disease and MSDs.

Exposure to flour dust is the UK’s second most common cited cause of occupational asthma. MSDs are the most common type of work-related illness in food manufacturing with handling injuries, accounting for around 20% of reported employee injuries (RIDDOR). HSE insists that such ill-health can be prevented when organisations have proper risk control systems in place.

The inspections will ensure measures are being taken by those responsible to protect workers against health risks and HSE will not hesitate to use enforcement to bring about improvements.

HSE’s head of Manufacturing Sector John Rowe, said: “The food manufacturing sector is made up of over 300,000 workers and its health and safety record needs to improve. This inspection initiative will look to ensure effective management and control of targeted health risks.

HSE is calling on anyone working in the industry to take the time to refresh their knowledge of our advice and guidance, available for free on our website.

Food manufacturing companies should do the right thing by protecting workers’ health; everyone has the right to go home healthy from work.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training; new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. uk[1][1][1]
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: gov.uk[2[2][2]]
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk[3][3]

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/hse-food-manufacturing-inspections-target-the-causes-of-workplace-ill-health/

Retail company and construction contractor fined over safety failings

Martin McColl Limited and JMS Retail Concepts Limited have both been sentenced today after two members of the public tripped and fell over construction work outside a convenience store in Dinas Powys, Vale of Glamorgan.

Cardiff Magistrates’ Court heard that during the three-day construction of a concrete disabled ramp in January 2016, two members of the public were injured whilst attempting to enter the store. On 12th January an elderly member of the public tripped over the construction work breaking her wrist, hitting her head and suffering severe bruising. The following day, the13th January 2016 another elderly member of public fell from the partially constructed ramp breaking his collar bone and suffering severe bruising.

An investigation by the Health Safety Executive (HSE) found that construction work which was undertaken while the store was open, meant customers were required to walk through the construction site to enter and exit the store. It would have been reasonably practicable to close the store during the construction of the ramp and install barriers and signs to prevent access by members of the public.

Martin McColl Limited of Ashwells Road, Brentwood, Essex pleaded guilty on the first day of a two day trial after initially pleading not guilty to breaching Section 3(1) of the Health Safety at Work etc. Act 1974, and have been fined £600,000 and ordered to pay costs of £11,520.

JMS Retail Concepts Limited of Stump Lane, Chorley, Lancashire pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3(1) of the Health Safety at Work etc. Act 1974, and have been fined £40,000 and ordered to pay costs of £3,038.

Speaking after the hearing HSE inspector Gemma Pavey said “These incidents could so easily have been avoided by simply carrying out correct control measures and safe working practices.

Commercial clients and companies should be aware that HSE will not hesitate to take appropriate enforcement action against those that fall below the required standards.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We seek to prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2017/retail-company-and-construction-contractor-fined-over-safety-failings/

Company and one of its directors fined for the unsafe storage of unauthorised biocidal products

A pest control company and one of its directors have been sentenced for the unsafe storage of unauthorised biocidal products and phostoxin (aluminium phosphide).

Ipswich Crown Court heard how Rodent Service (East Anglia) Limited stored non-approved biocides and pesticides including phostoxin (used for the control of pests and vermin) at its premises at Cooke Road, Lowestoft.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) arising from a report provided by Natural England into the alleged secondary poisoning of a tawny owl by a rodenticide (a biocidal compound), found various biocidal compounds which were not authorised for use improperly stored at the premises. In addition, part used canisters of phostoxin (a compound that reacts with moisture in the atmosphere or the soil to produce phosphine, a poisonous gas, used to control rabbits within their burrows) were found stored inside a filing cabinet within the workplace.

Rodent Service (East Anglia) Limited of Cooke Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk pleaded guilty to breaching Sections 2 (1) and 3 (1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 The company has been fined £100,000 and ordered to pay costs of £10,000. The company was also ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £170.

Donald Eric Martin, Director of Rodent Service (East Anglia) Limited also pleaded guilty of an offence of neglect by virtue of S37 of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. He was sentenced to a six months in prison, suspended for 12 months, and ordered to pay costs of £1000 and a victim surcharge of £115.00.

Speaking after sentencing HSE Principal Inspector Paul Carter commented: “This situation could so easily have been avoided by the company disposing of those biocidal and similar high-risk compounds not authorised for storage and use and ensuring that only sealed containers of phostoxin were kept on site stored safely in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Companies should be aware that HSE will not hesitate to take appropriate enforcement action against those that fall below the required standards.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training; new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. gov.uk[1][1]
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk[2[2]]
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk[3]

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2017/company-and-one-of-its-directors-fined-for-the-unsafe-storage-of-unauthorised-biocidal-products/

Scaffold Inspectors prosecuted after worker falls from height

Two scaffold Inspectors have been prosecuted after a worker fell through a gap between the scaffolding and the building, resulting in serious injuries.

Greater Manchester Magistrates’ Court heard how on 26th March 2014, the 49-year old worker was working on a re-roofing project. As he stepped down from the untiled roof onto a fixed scaffold, he fell through a gap between the working platform of the scaffolding and the building. He suffered fracture injuries to his spine and had to wear a back brace for -eight weeks.

The scaffolding had been signed off as safe for use by Mr Stephen Harper and Mr Garry Arnold. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) investigation revealed that they had not carried out the relevant inspections and had falsified the certificates to show that all was safe for use.

Speaking after the hearing HSE Inspector Matt Greenly said: “Scaffold Inspectors are relied upon by workers and must be trusted. Falsely completing reports without carrying out a thorough inspection can lead to serious risks being missed and life changing accidents occurring.”

Mr. Stephen Harper of Alkrington, Middleton and Mr. Garry Arnold of Crookes, Sheffield, pleaded guilty to breaching Section 7(a) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and were each sentenced to 170 hours community service and ordered to pay £1,500 costs.

Notes to Editors:
1.The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It helps Great Britain work well by applying a broad range of regulatory interventions and scientific expertise, to prevent work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training, new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. www.hse.gov.uk
2.More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/ link to external website
3.HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2017/scaffold-inspectors-prosecuted-after-worker-falls-from-height/

Waste removal contractor fined after asbestos concerns

A waste removal contractor from Bridgend has been sentenced after undertaking asbestos removal work at two locations without being licensed to do so.

Swansea Magistrates’ Court heard how, on two occasions 1 September and 7 November 2016 Mark John Gibson, who advertised as an asbestos removal service, was contracted to remove asbestos containing materials from properties in Pont Y Clun and Dyffryn Chapel, Caerau.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that Mr Gibson (trading as All-Gone Waste) worked with asbestos containing materials that required him to have a licence from the HSE. He did not and has never had a licence issued to him for this purpose.

Mark John Gibson of High View, Bridgend pleaded guilty to breaching Regulations 8 (1) of the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012, and Regulations 2(1) and 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. He has been fined £1500.00 and ordered to pay costs of £2657.00

Speaking after the hearing HSE inspector Phil Nicolle said: “Mr Gibson undertook asbestos removal work which he was not licensed to do.

“Asbestos removal must be done by HSE licensed contractors to ensure the highest standards are met to prevent health risks to employees and members of public.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It helps Great Britain work well by applying a broad range of regulatory interventions and scientific expertise, to prevent work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training, new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2017/waste-removal-contractor-fined-after-asbestos-concerns/

Waste and recycling industry being told to clean up by regulator

Companies and people working in the waste and recycling industry are being told they must pay closer attention to how they manage workplace risk or face serious penalties.

The Health and Safety Executive’s (HSE) programme of proactive inspections will review health and safety standards in waste and recycling businesses across the country, and the industry is being warned that unannounced inspections will begin next week.

The visits come as HSE releases its sector plans which pinpoint the waste and recycling industry as a priority sector.

The waste and recycling sector, which is made up of around 120,000 workers, has a statistically higher rate of workplace injury and work-related ill health than other sectors and workers in this industry are more likely to suffer work-related illness than any other sector.

Within the waste and recycling sector the main causes of fatal injuries to workers are being struck by moving vehicles, coming into contact with moving machinery and being injured by something collapsing or overturning.

HSE insists these incidents can be prevented when organisations have proper risk management in place. In the five years to 2016/17 there were 39 fatalities to workers and 11 members of the public were killed as a result of work activity in the sector.

The inspections will ensure measures are being taken by those responsible to protect workers and employers against risk and injury and HSE will not hesitate to use enforcement to bring about improvements.

HSE’s head of waste and recycling Rick Brunt, said: “The waste and recycling industry continues to have one of the poorest health and safety records.

This inspection initiative will look at certain activities to ensure effective management and control of risk.

“HSE is calling on anyone working in the industry to take the time to refresh their knowledge of our advice and guidance, available for free on our website. Every worker has the right to return from work safe in the knowledge that their employer takes their health and safety seriously.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It helps Great Britain work well by applying a broad range of regulatory interventions and scientific expertise, to prevent work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training, new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2017/waste-and-recycling-industry-being-told-to-clean-up-by-regulator/

Construction company and project manager fined after multiple safety failings

A London-based construction company and project manager have been fined for repeatedly failing to manage and control multiple risks.

Reading Magistrates’ Court heard how, after concerns were raised by both workers and members of the public, HSE inspectors made a number of visits during 2015 to two project sites where In House Design Build Ltd was the principal contractor and identified a number of serious health and safety failings.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that over a four-month period at the first site, and despite several enforcement notices being served, the company still failed to adequately address the risks. The notices served were for breaches including unsafe work at height, working in unstable deep excavations and inadequate arrangements for planning, managing and monitoring construction work. Further similar concerns were found later in the year at the second site where very poor welfare arrangements were also noted.

In House Design and Build Limited, of Royalty House, Dean Street, London, pleaded guilty to two breaches under Regulation 13 (1) of the Construction Design and Management Regulations 2015. The company was fined £100,000.

Project manager, Neil Crow, of Woodgrange Avenue, London, who had been in charge of operations at both sites, pleaded guilty to two breaches under Regulation 13 (1) of the Construction Design and Management Regulations 2015, by virtue of Section 37 of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974. He was fined £15,000.

Full costs of £15,000 were also awarded.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Dominic Goacher said: “Principal contractors and their managers have a duty to ensure risks to workers are managed throughout the construction phase of projects. This case serves as a reminder to those responsible of the importance of ensuring construction work is properly planned, managed and monitored so that serious risks are identified and eliminated or controlled. It was only by good fortune that someone was not seriously injured or killed in this instance.”

Further safety in construction guidance for principal contractors can be found here: http://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/cdm/2015/principal-contractors.htm

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It helps Great Britain work well by applying a broad range of regulatory interventions and scientific expertise, to prevent work-related death, injury and ill-health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training, new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2017/construction-company-and-project-manager-fined-after-multiple-safety-failings/

Company fined after chemical explosion

An oil storage company has been fined after contractors cut into a sealed pipe causing an explosion inside a tank.

Liverpool Crown Court heard that on 19 January 2015, contractors of ESL Fuels Ltd cut into a sealed pipe using a grinder. The pipe, which was attached to a tank, was being used as part of a waste oil recovery process at their North Blend Tank Farm. Flammable gases within the pipe ignited, resulting in an explosion within the tank and the tank lid and vent pipe being partially detached and projected over a raised walkway.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that the company was having difficulty with the waste oil recovery process which was foaming out of the vessel and filling its bund. The company’s tests were inadequate and failed to identify the cause of the problem which was generating flammable carbon monoxide gas. A decision was taken to connect the vessel by pipework to an emergency relief dump tank to prevent a potential catastrophic overpressure in the tank but the safety implications of this modification and its design were not risk assessed. HSE also found systemic failings with the company’s management of contractors and an inadequate Permit to Work system, with the contractors being unaware that the tank and pipework were in use and may contain flammable gas, when carrying out hot work that was a source of ignition.

ESL Fuels Ltd, based at the Stanlow Oil Terminal near Ellesmere Port, pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3(1) and Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and has been fined £100,000 and ordered to pay costs of £17,000.

Speaking after the hearing HSE inspector Matthew Lea said: “Even though nobody was injured this incident could have been prevented if the problems with the process and the subsequent design modification had been properly investigated, risk assessed and dealt with, and if the work of the contractors had been adequately controlled.

“The contractors were unaware that they were working on live plant in the North Blend Tank Farm nor how it could impact on their safety.

“HSE has brought this prosecution because failures took place that could have resulted in death or serious injury and we believe every person should be healthy and safe at work.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It helps Great Britain work well by applying a broad range of regulatory interventions and scientific expertise, to prevent work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training, new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. hse.gov.uk[1]
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/ [2]
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2017/company-fined-after-chemical-explosion/

Bridgend businesses benefit from BEEP

Local businesses enjoyed a free business forum to help them understand and manage workplace health, safety and wellbeing for workers.

The Bridgend Employers’ Engagement Project (BEEP) event followed information gathering visits to more than 370 businesses on Bridgend’s industrial estates by officers from Shared Regulatory Services, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and Healthy Working Wales.

Local companies were invited to the Heronston Hotel, on Wednesday (27 Sep) to discuss what help they needed for them to manage workplace risks. They were then directed to sources of business support for health, safety and wellbeing.

The topics covered by workshop sessions at Wednesday’s forum were tailored to reflect the specific needs identified by delegates.

Neil Craig, HSE’s head of operations, said after the event: “In terms of the broad scope and range of businesses invited, and the advice available to attendees BEEP is unique in Wales.

“Today’s forum is just the beginning. The aim is to promote collective ownership of health, safety and wellbeing in Bridgend that best reflects local circumstances, to reduce the cost to business of injury and ill health.”

HSE and IOSH worked with employers, regulators, insurers, specialists and consultants to deliver the event. By sharing experience and examples, presenters at the forum stimulated discussion of good practice and proportionate health and safety.

This was supported by targeted, relevant advice, information and useful materials from exhibitors for delegates to take away.

One of the attendees, Gareth Davies of Inscapes and Bridgend Patio Centre said: ‘It was good to rub shoulders with HSE inspectors and officers in a relaxed environment as opposed to under a different circumstance in the workplace.

“We also had access to free specialised help and advice from consultants, which was hugely informative and helpful.”

More events such as this are planned for the future and HSE is keen for people to make full use of the resource to ensure Bridgend businesses Help GB work well.

The health and safety system strategy for Great Britain, ‘Helping Great Britain Work Well’ brings together employers, workers, regulators, government representatives, professional bodies, trade associations and unions to continue to improve on our already excellent health and safety record. The collective aim is to continue to boost productivity, support innovation and encourage business growth. http://www.hse.gov.uk/strategy/index.htm #HGBWW

Notes to editors 

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It helps Great Britain work well by applying a broad range of regulatory interventions and scientific expertise, to prevent work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training, new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. hse.gov.uk
  2. More information about assessing and controlling the risks in the work place can be found at: http://www.hse.gov.uk/risk/index.htm
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk
  4. IOSH is the Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; the Chartered body for health and safety professionals (www.iosh.co.uk)

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2017/bridgend-businesses-benefit-from-beep/