Category Archives: Accident Report Form News

Brick manufacturer fined after worker seriously injured in machinery incident

Forterra Building Products Limited has been fined after a worker had his left arm amputated and was left paralysed from the chest down after being drawn into machinery.

Burnley Magistrates’ Court heard how on 8 July 2017, Eddie Ely, a chargehand with Forterra Building Products Ltd was working with a group of colleagues to remove a blockage and spillage on a conveyor when he was drawn into the conveyor system. Guards had been removed from the machine but the power had not been isolated.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that Forterra Building Products Ltd had failed to properly ensure that machines were always isolated from power, to be made safe, before guarding was removed from machinery.

Forterra Building Products Ltd pleaded guilty to breaching Sections 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc act 1974. Total fines of £200000 were imposed with costs of £7529.11.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Steven Boyd said: “This case shows the devastating consequences of coming into contact with dangerous machinery. It is crucial that companies have a clear procedure for isolating machinery and they have appropriate supervision and monitoring to ensure it is adhered to.”

Notes to Editors

1.The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk

2.More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/ [1]

3.HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/brick-manufacturer-fined-after-worker-seriously-injured-in-machinery-incident/

Fine for engineering company following life-changing hand injuries to worker

An engineering company has been fined after an employee’s little finger and ring finger were amputated at the first knuckle.

Birmingham Magistrates’ Court heard that on 29 January 2018 the employee was working at a site on Holford Way in Birmingham when his gloved hand came into contact with a rotating spindle on a Slack and Par horizontal quick tapping machine and became entangled.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that Rical Ltd trading as Avon PDC failed to ensure that effective measures were taken to prevent access to the dangerous parts, namely the rotating spindles, of a Slack and Parr horizontal quick tapping machine.

Rical Limited, trading as Avon PDC of Holford Way, Witton, Birmingham pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 11(1) of The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 and has been fined £14,000 and ordered to pay costs of £1,383.88.

Speaking after the hearing HSE inspector Karen Sweeney said “This injury was easily preventable and the risk should have been identified. Employers should make sure they properly assess and apply effective control measures to minimise the risk from dangerous parts of machinery.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regular for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. hse.gov.uk

  1. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at legislation.gov.uk/

 

  1. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

  1. Further information about health and safety can be found at http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg33.htm.

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/fine-for-engineering-company-following-life-changing-hand-injuries-to-worker/

South Yorkshire manufacturing company fined after worker suffers hand injuries

Symmetry Medical Sheffield Limited, trading as Tecomet, was sentenced today for safety breaches after a worker suffered serious injuries.

Sheffield Magistrates’ Court heard how on 8 August 2016, the worker was helping to move a hardness testing machine when it fell from the pedestrian pallet truck it was being transported on and struck his left hand.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that the machine, which was resting on a stand, was lifted with a pedestrian pallet truck by the worker. The worker had not been trained on how to use the truck and the machine stand did not have suitable channels for the forks of the truck. The machine and stand were not secured to the pallet truck and the machine fell and came away from the stand. It toppled towards a wall and struck the workers hand resulting in a full amputated finger and impact damage to a second finger.

Symmetry Medical Sheffield Ltd trading as Tecomet of Beulah Road, Sheffield pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2 (1) of the Health Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and was fined £275,000.00 with £1237.00 costs.

After the hearing, HSE inspector Anuja Mistry-Raval commented: “This incident could so easily have been avoided by implementing suitable control measures and adopting safe working practices.

“The risks of loads falling from lifting equipment when not properly attached or secured in place are well known.

“Suitable systems of work are fundamental for ensuring workers’ safety.”

Notes to Editors

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/ [1]
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/south-yorkshire-manufacturing-company-fined-after-worker-suffers-hand-injuries/

Building company and director sentenced after carrying out unsafe and unnecessary work

A building company and its director have been sentenced today after carrying out unsafe and unnecessary building work.

BBS Improvements Limited and sole director Barrie John Henry Birch were sentenced after a joint investigation by Worcestershire Trading Standards Service and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) uncovered a string of health and safety and fraud offences.

Worcester Crown Court heard how Mr Birch, operating under BBS Improvements Ltd, was employed to carry out building work on a domestic property in Redditch in May 2017. A complaint was made to Trading Standards who instructed an expert to examine the roof. The expert confirmed that the work was wholly unnecessary and that the work done had no value whatsoever. During the course of their investigations Trading Standards also uncovered potential health and safety issues.

HSE inspectors found that the company was carrying out work at height without scaffolding and that there were no measures in place to prevent employees from falling.

People were walking on the roof of the house with no safety measures in place to prevent them from falling and Mr Birch was present and fully aware of the people working unsafely on the roof.

At the time the complaint was received Mr Birch was also before the court for similar offences committed while trading as a sole trader under the name BBS Improvements.

The Court heard how Mr Birch was employed to carry out minor roofing repair work on a domestic property in Bromsgrove in June 2016. After inspecting the roof Mr Birch advised the homeowner that the whole roof required replacing. A Trading Standards investigation, involving an expert examination of the roof found that the work to replace the roof was totally unnecessary.

Mr Birch admitted an offence under the Fraud Act 2006 and an offence under the Consumer Protection from unfair Trading Regulations 2008 in relation to unnecessary work carried out at a property in Bromsgrove during June 2016. He also pleaded guilty to breaching Section 37 of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974.

Mr Birch also asked for 5 other, similar matters to be taken into consideration including two offences of failing to provide the 10 Year Insurance Backed Guarantee.

For the Trading Standards offences and the HSE offences Mr Birch was sentenced to 12 months imprisonment, suspended for 2 years, ordered to do 250 hours of unpaid work and was disqualified from being a Company Director for 5 years. He was ordered to pay compensation to the victims and to make a contribution to the prosecution costs. BBS Improvements Limited pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 6 (3) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005 and the company was fined £200. Speaking after the hearing HSE inspector Matthew Whitaker said: “This prosecution demonstrates how the HSE works in partnership with other enforcers like Trading Standards, to tackle serious crime and dangerous working practices which put people at risk of death and serious injury. “Falls from height remain one of the most common causes of work related fatalities in this country and the risks associated with working at height are well known. “In this case, suitable measures such as scaffolding should have been provided to ensure the health and safety of people working at height on the roof”. Cllr Lucy Hodgson said: “The work done by our small team of Trading Standards Officers to protect Worcestershire consumers cannot go unrecognised.

“In this case Barrie Birch was instructed to carry out relatively minor work but then advised the homeowners that major work was needed when it was not.”

“This type of fraudulent activity will not be tolerated in Worcestershire. Our Trading Standards Officers actively investigate criminal complaints of rogue builders such as this, and will continue to do so to protect the public.

“The sentence handed down in this case clearly shows that the Courts view this type of offending very seriously.”

Notes to Editors

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/building-company-and-director-sentenced-after-carrying-out-unsafe-and-unnecessary-work/

Companies plead guilty following 2011 refinery explosion

Before Haverfordwest Magistrates’ Court, Valero Energy UK Limited and B A Contracts Limited today pleaded guilty to charges under Sections 2 (1) and 3 (1) of the Health and Safety at Work Etc Act 1974.

The charges relate to the deaths of Dennis Riley, Robert Broome, Andrew Jenkins and Julie Jones and major injuries to Andrew Phillips who were all working on the Amine Recovery Unit when an explosion and subsequent fire took place on 2 June 2011.

This prosecution has been brought by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

The case is next due to be heard at Swansea Crown Court on 2 November 2018.

A HSE spokesperson said: “HSE acknowledges the defendants’ guilty plea but will not make a further comment until after sentencing.”

 

Notes to Editors

1.The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk

2.More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk

3.HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/companies-plead-guilty-following-2011-refinery-explosion/

Company and director sentenced after resident injured

A Cornish construction company and its director have been sentenced after a resident fell through the balcony at his home during recent refurbishment work.

Truro Magistrates’ Court heard how, on 18 August 2016, 58-year old Simon Powell, who has impaired mobility and suffers from epilepsy, had been sitting on the balcony at his property when he fell more than three metres through a plastic panel, which had been installed within his balcony and onto the beach below. Mr Powell suffered multiple fractures and damage to his liver. ChristalClearProperties Ltd had been working on the refurbishment of the neighbouring riverside property which included changes to that property’s balcony which required it to be extended to join that of Mr Powell’s.  Sheets of plywood and plastic were used to temporarily infill the completed balcony framework prior to the toughened safety glass infills being fitted.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that in the absence of safety glazing, the fall prevention measures were inadequate and there were no measures in place to prevent access to the balcony until the construction work had been completed. The investigation also found there was no construction phase plan in place and no specific risk assessment for the use of plywood or plastic as an interim measure. The plastic sheeting that had been used was an unsuitable material as it did not afford Mr Powell any impact protection.

ChristalClearProperties Ltd of Langurtho Road, Fowey, Cornwall pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and has been fined £22,000 with costs of £4,782.72.

Anthony John Ham of Langurtho Road, Fowey, Cornwall pleaded guilty to breaching Section 37 of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, and has been given a 12 week prison sentence, suspended for 12 months. He was also ordered to pay costs of £4782.72.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Georgina Speake said: “This incident could so easily have been avoided by simply carrying out correct control measures and safe working practices.

“Falls from height remain one of the most common causes of work related fatalities/injuries in this country and the risks associated with working at height are well known.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

 

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/company-and-director-sentenced-after-resident-injured/

Builder sentenced after young worker seriously-injured

A builder from Cornwall has been sentenced after one of his employees sustained serious, life-changing hand injuries whilst operating a handheld circular saw.

Bodmin Magistrates’ Court heard how David Avent, trading as David Avent Building Services, undertook a barn refurbishment in Callington during February 2017. On 7 February, a worker, who had recently turned 17, was using a circular saw to cut wooden flooring sheets when the blade made contact with his hand causing serious, life-changing injuries. The saw blade cut fully through his index finger, three quarters through his middle finger and half way through his ring finger.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found David Avent had no record of any information, instruction and training that he had provided to his employee in the safe use of the circular saw nor had he ensured that safe working practices were followed when cutting the flooring sheet. The investigation also found that circular saw blade had not been properly adjusted for the size of material being cut at the time of the incident and the flooring sheet was not appropriately supported whilst being cut.

David Avent of Callington, Cornwall pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and Regulation 3(4) of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999. He has been fined £1,120 and ordered to pay costs of £8489.48.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Dr Jo-Anne Michael said: “This injury was easily preventable and the risk associated with the task should have been identified.”

“Employers should make sure they properly assess and apply effective control measures to minimise the risk from contact with dangerous parts of machinery to ensure that the risks are given careful attention to ensure they are properly controlled.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 [3]

 

 

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/builder-sentenced-after-young-worker-seriously-injured/

Company fined after worker seriously injured when repairing machinery

A quarry operator has been fined after an employee had his hand and arm caught in a conveyor belt.

Lochmaddy Sherriff Court heard how, on 2 November 2016, employees of MacAulay Askernish Limited were undertaking maintenance work on the conveyor belt of a screener unit that was slipping at Askernish Quarry on the Isle of South Uist. One of the workers, Donald Campbell, was leaning through the opening in the conveyor frame when his hand was pulled into the nip point between the drive drum and conveyor belt. His arm quickly became entangled in the mechanism, causing severe injury, permanent disfigurement and impairment.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found the guarding of the screener unit was not adequate. The investigation also found the company failed to have in place a suitable procedure for the isolation of the screener unit and to ensure the unit was maintained in good repair as other guard panels were not in place.

Macaulay Askernish Limited of Hillside Office, Lochboisdale, Isle of South Uist, pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 6(1) of the Quarries Regulations 1999 and has been fined £30,000.

Speaking after the hearing HSE inspector, Mike Tetley said: “This injury was easily preventable and the risks from this type of equipment are well-known.

“Companies operating belt conveyors must ensure access has been prevented to dangerous parts and that guards are properly maintained. Having a secure isolation procedure in place is also an essential control when undertaking maintenance work.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

 

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/company-fined-after-worker-seriously-injured-when-repairing-machinery/

Businessman sentenced after failing to prevent exposure to asbestos

A Manchester-based businessman has been prosecuted after failing to check whether asbestos was present in a building he owned before starting major refurbishment works.

Manchester Magistrates’ Court heard how Mr Whaid Ahmed did not survey his property at 1-3 Stephenson Square, Manchester for asbestos before carrying out renovations to the building between 1 April 2012 and 12 October 2017. Following a routine inspection from a Health and Safety Executive (HSE) inspector, a survey was subsequently carried out. Large amounts of asbestos, some of which was in very poor condition, was discovered on the premises, indicating that asbestos could have previously been removed without any controls in place from areas of the building already renovated.

The HSE investigation found Mr Ahmed failed to identify the risks involved, and put appropriate measures in place to prevent exposure to asbestos. Mr Ahmed has had previous enforcement action from HSE over a similar issue so was well aware of his duties under the law.

Mr Whaid Ahmed of Hale Barns, Altrincham pleaded guilty to breaching Regulations 5(a), 11(1)(a) and 16 of the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012. Mr Ahmed was given a six months prison sentence, suspended for two years, sentenced to 250 community service hours and ordered to pay costs of £5,742.14.

HSE inspector Matt Greenly said after the case: “This case highlights the importance of surveying a property for asbestos to prevent risk to anyone occupying or working in that building and to reduce the risk of exposure to asbestos and contracting incurable diseases as a result of that exposure.”

Notes to Editors:

1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/businessman-sentenced-after-failing-to-prevent-exposure-to-asbestos/

Construction firms targeted in new health inspections

Construction firms across Great Britain will be targeted on their health standards by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) it has been announced.

These inspections will be the first time the regulator has targeted the industry with a specific focus on respiratory risks and occupational lung disease, looking at the measures businesses have in place to protect their workers’ lungs from the likes of asbestos, silica and wood dust.

Inspectors will be visiting construction businesses and sites across the country throughout October and will specifically be looking for evidence of construction workers knowing the risks, planning their work and using the right controls, and if necessary will use enforcement to ensure people are protected.

HSE’s Peter Baker, chief inspector of construction said:

“Around 100 times as many workers die from diseases caused or made worse by their work than are killed in construction accidents. Annually, work-related cancers, mainly linked to asbestos and silica, are estimated to kill 3,500 people from the industry. Thousands of others suffer life-changing illnesses from their work. Not all lung diseases take years to develop. Some, like acute silicosis or occupational asthma, can occur more quickly.

“As a result, we’ve launched this inspection initiative to find out what exactly businesses in the construction industry are doing today to protect their workers’ health, particularly when it comes to exposure to dust and damage to lungs.

“We want construction workers to be aware of the risks associated with the activities they carry out on a daily basis; be conscious of the fact their work may create hazardous dust; and consider how this could affect their health, in some cases irreversibly. We want businesses and their workers to think of the job from start to finish and avoid creating dust or disturbing asbestos by working in different ways. We want to see construction firms encouraging their workers to firstly keep the dust down and wear the right mask and clothing.

“Ultimately, we want construction workers’ lungs to be protected from ill health, so they can go home healthy to their families and enjoy long careers in this important industry.”

For more information on the programme of inspections and to download our free #DustBuster selfie cards visit: https://bit.ly/2QWLYib and follow the campaign on Twitter at @H_S_E, on Facebook @hsegovuk and @SaferSites. You can also join the conversation at #WorkRight

-ENDS-

Notes to Editors:
1. During the upcoming programme of inspections, while the primary focus will be on health, if a HSE inspector sees any issues of concern, they will take the necessary enforcement action to deal with this.
2. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Article source: http://press.hse.gov.uk/2018/construction-firms-targeted-in-new-health-inspections/